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Expansion of DBS Checks to Garage Owners

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The list of people who require a DBS check to carry out their work is constantly changing. Keeping track of all the changes can be tricky. Changes are advertised on the government website but it can be difficult to sort the minor tweaks to the system from the wholescale changes. One of the biggest changes in recent months seems to have flown entirely under the radar. This change affects garage owners and people who are running MOT checks on your car.

 

What’s Changing?

At present, a disclosure check isn’t part of the accreditation process for becoming a MOT tester. Mechanics just have to prove that they understand the workings of a car to a high level, and can apply the DVSA guidelines to assess whether a car comes up to scratch or not. The new rules add getting a basic DBS check into this accreditation process. People who are currently carrying out MOT tests or are managing a garage which is also a test centre don’t have to rush out and immediately get a check. The process will be rolled out gradually, with mechanics and garage owners applying for a certificate the next time their licence is due for renewal.

 

Added Confidence

The DVSA are introducing basic DBS checks on all mechanics and garage owners in an attempt to increase public confidence in the overall MOT testing process. Historically, car dealers and garages have often had a shady reputation, often undeserved. It is thought that asking all people who will carry out MOT tests or who own garages to verify their criminal record will set the public’s mind at ease and demonstrate that the DVSA is doing everything it can to weed out the very small percentage of garage owners who aren’t reputable. This is just part of the system which they use to check that garages are acting honestly and testing cars to the right standards.

 

Reporting Requirements

In addition to the new rules about applying for a basic DBS check when a mechanic applies for a MOT testing licence, there are also new rules about reporting convictions to the DBS after a licence has been granted. Getting a criminal conviction doesn’t mean that someone’s right to perform MOT checks will be automatically withdrawn. The DBS would look at the type of conviction and the mechanic’s overall criminal record, and made a decision on a case by case basis.

 

Getting a DBS Check

This new requirement for mechanics and garage owners to get a DBS check will be incorporated into the current application process. There will be no separate route for garage employees, who will complete the same forms and provide the same identity documents as everyone else. As most garages will not be registered to check workers’ identities, this will be done through the DVSA or another body before the forms are sent to the DBS for checking. Certificates are returned to the applicant, who can then show it to their employer, or submit it with the rest of their documents when applying for accreditation to run MOT tests.